Why radioactivity is a nuclear phenomenon?

Answer 1

For the following reasons, radioactivity has to be a nuclear phenomenon: radioactive decay particles come in three different varieties, and each one carries a clue as to where it came from.

The term "Alpha Rays" refers to the positively charged, heavy alpha particles that, upon examination, were discovered to be the Helium-4 nucleus. Because of the remarkable stability of the configuration of two protons and two neutrons, larger nuclei appear to be disintegrating in these units. Since protons and neutrons are unquestionably constituents of the nucleus, alpha radiation makes it evident that the source of the particles is the atomic nucleus.

Beta Rays : Beta radiation is made of beta particles that are either positively (#\beta^{+}# decay) or negatively (#\beta^{-}# decay) charged. When examined carefully they were found to be positrons, in the case of #\beta^{+}# decay and electrons , in the case of #\beta^{+}# decay. The electron could be from outside the nucleus but the clue for their nuclear origin comes from the change that happens to the nuclear charge after the beta decay. After a nucleus undergoes a #\beta^{-}# decay, emitting an electron, it is found that the atomic number of the nuclus goes up by one. This is a clear indication that the electron is the byproduct of some interaction involving the nucleons.

When analyzed, gamma radiation was found to be extremely high energetic electromagnetic radiation with energies in the MeV range. Since electronic rearrangement can produce photons with energies in the few eV range, the gamma rays cannot be the result of electronic rearrangements; instead, they must be of nuclear origin because the energy levels of the nucleons in atomic nuclei are in the MeV range.

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Answer 2

Since radioactivity results from nuclear excitation in an element with a proton count of less than 82 and a n/p ratio that ranges from 0 to 1, it is classified as a nuclear phenomenon.

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Answer 3

Radioactivity is a nuclear phenomenon because it involves the spontaneous emission of particles or electromagnetic radiation from the unstable atomic nuclei of certain elements. This emission occurs as a result of the imbalance between the strong nuclear force, which holds protons and neutrons together in the nucleus, and the electromagnetic force, which repels protons due to their like charges. To achieve stability, unstable nuclei undergo radioactive decay, during which they release energy in the form of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, or other particles. This process is inherently nuclear because it originates from within the atomic nucleus itself.

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Answer from HIX Tutor

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

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