Why only one of the enantiomers of glucose has that familiar sweet taste and only that enantiomer can fuel our cellular functioning?

Answer 1

L-glucose tastes the same as D-glucose, so your first assumption is false.

Because hexokinase, the first enzyme in the glycolysis pathway, cannot phosphorylate glucose, glucose cannot power our cells.

A block to this step prevents the cell from using glucose in any other way.

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Answer 2

The sweet taste of glucose is due to its interaction with taste receptors on the tongue, specifically with the T1R2/T1R3 heterodimer receptor. Only the D-enantiomer of glucose can bind effectively to these receptors, triggering a sweet taste sensation. This is because our taste receptors are stereospecific, meaning they can distinguish between different spatial arrangements of molecules. While both enantiomers of glucose can be metabolized for energy in cellular functioning, only the D-enantiomer fits into the active sites of enzymes involved in glycolysis and other metabolic pathways, allowing for efficient utilization by cells.

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Answer from HIX Tutor

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

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