What is the length of a frog's small intestine in proportion to its body size?

Question
Answer 1

A frog's small intestine is about twice its body length.

Most tadpoles eat algae and plants.

They need long small intestines so the fibrous material has more time to digest and be absorbed.


(From National Geographic Society (blogs))

You can see their coiled intestines through their translucent skin.

Their intestinal length is about ten times their body length.

Depending on their size, frogs eat insects, worms, small snakes, and mice.

Their diet is mostly protein, which is much easier to digest than fibre.

Adult frogs can therefore have a shorter small intestine. It is only about twice their body length.

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Answer 2
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