What happened to Germany after WWII?

Answer 1

The end of WWII marked the end of Nazi Germany, and the formation of the occupation zones- along with the beginning of the Cold war.

When World War II came to an end in Europe in 1945, "The big three"—the United States, the Soviet Union, and Britain—had already planned how they would deal with Germany. At the conference in Yalta, Churchill, Stalin, and Roosevelt decided to divide Germany into four occupation zones: one each for France, Britain, America, and Russia, and to divide Berlin, which was located in the Soviet zone, into four zones as well.

In that sense, World War II completely destroyed Germany and most of Europe since strategic bombing had become a vital tactic, with few cities and industrial structures able to withstand the bombers.

In order to "contain" the communist threat posed by the USSR, the USA initiated the Marshall Plan, which involved providing generous financial aid to Europe in order to both rebuild the continent and prevent its citizens from harboring Communist sympathies. The end of World War II also signaled the start of the Cold War, and tensions had already been raised when the US perceived the USSR to be expanding its influence in the east and annexing numerous eastern nations.

The USSR tightened its grip on their zone and eventually Blockade Berlin in response, trying to starve out the "western" part of Berlin, but it failed and the USSR had to back down. Eventually, Britain, France, and the US combined their three occupation zones to create "West Germany" in 1949, which the USSR saw as a threat. The USSR claimed that the biggest fear it had was the reconstruction of a strong Germany after WWII.

After the Berlin Crisis, in 1961, work on the Berlin Wall began, further dividing Germany and keeping it that way for nearly thirty years.

Germany would continue to represent the Cold War; the Berlin Wall had already fallen in 1989, and the ideological division between east and west Germany served as a constant reminder of the conflict, which ended in 1991.

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Answer 2

After World War II, Germany was divided into four occupation zones controlled by the Allied powers: the United States, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, and France. The country was also split into East Germany (controlled by the Soviets) and West Germany (controlled by the United States, United Kingdom, and France). Germany underwent significant political, economic, and social changes during this period. The country faced widespread destruction, both physically and economically, due to the war. The Allies initiated denazification programs to rid Germany of Nazi influence and prosecute war criminals. Additionally, Germany underwent demilitarization and disarmament.

In the post-war years, Germany faced significant challenges in rebuilding its economy and infrastructure. The Marshall Plan, a U.S.-led initiative to aid European recovery, played a crucial role in Germany's reconstruction. West Germany experienced an economic miracle, known as the "Wirtschaftswunder," characterized by rapid industrialization, economic growth, and prosperity.

The division of Germany into East and West led to ideological and political differences. East Germany became a socialist state under Soviet influence, while West Germany embraced democracy and capitalism. The Berlin Wall, erected in 1961, symbolized the division between East and West Germany.

In 1990, following the collapse of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War, East and West Germany were reunified. The reunification process involved significant political, economic, and social integration efforts. Today, Germany is a unified and prosperous nation, playing a leading role in European and global affairs.

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Answer from HIX Tutor

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

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