Is “ekphrastic” poetry composed from the Greek words ek (out) and phrazein (tell, declare, pronounce), ekphrasis, originally meant "telling in full"?

Answer 1

The etymologies I was able to find are consistent with the one posed in the question, and so "ekphrasis" refers to the pointing out or explaining of something in detail.

Here, I've cited a few different sources.

The term "ekphrasis" has the following etymology, or word development, according to the website wikitonary:

ἐκφρασις ‎(ékphrasis, “description”), from ἐκφράζω ‏(ekphrázō, “I describe”), from ἐκ ‏(ek, “out, ex-”) + φράζω ‏(phrázō, “I explain, point out”).

Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Wikipedia provides the following etymology:

The verb ἐκφράζειν ekphrázein, which means "to proclaim or call an inanimate object by name," and the Greek words ek and φράσις phrásis, which mean "out" and "speak," respectively, are the sources of the word.

“Ekphrasis” (https://en.wikipedia.org)

Given that we are discussing poetry that was initially intended to discuss a subject in its entirety, the etymologies presented here do, in fact, correspond with the etymologies in the original question.

Today, ekphrastic poetry is poetry that is written about an artwork (the wikipedia page about the Mona Lisa is an example of ekphrastic poetry about art). However, in the past, it was poetry that was rich in vivid (or perhaps more accurately, "painstaking" or even "mind-numbing") detail; for example, the Iliad, a Greek epic poem, is mentioned in the link below, with 150 lines devoted to describing the hero Achilles' shield!

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Answer 2

Yes, "ekphrastic" poetry is derived from the Greek words "ek" meaning "out" and "phrazein" meaning "tell, declare, pronounce." Originally, "ekphrasis" did indeed mean "telling in full."

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Answer from HIX Tutor

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

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