How ionic bonds conduct electricity?

Answer 1

Ionic bonds, direct electrostatic interactions between oppositely charged do not conduct electricity unless (i) the ionic species is molten, or (ii) the ionic species is dissolved in a suitable (usually aqueous) solvent.

Let's take common salt, #NaCl#, as an example. The solid species will not conduct electricity. Why not? Because the ions are bound (by electrostatic interactions) in a solid, infinite array, in which the individual ions that form the lattice are not free to move (and not free to carry a charge).
Raise the temperature enough (to #801# #@C#), and the sodium chloride melts, disrupting these strong ionic interactions, and now the ions are free to move, and can carry a current. We can get the same effect, if we dissolve the salt in water and chemically disrupt the bonds between the sodium and chloride ions. Now separated, and solvated by water molecules, these ions can transmit a current.
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Answer 2

Ionic bonds conduct electricity because ions are formed when atoms gain or lose electrons, creating positively or negatively charged particles. In a solid ionic compound, these ions are held together in a lattice structure but are free to move when the compound is dissolved in water or melted. This movement of ions allows the flow of electric current, making ionic compounds good conductors of electricity in these states.

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Answer 3

Ionic bonds conduct electricity when the ions in an ionic compound are free to move. In solid form, ions are locked in a fixed position, so they cannot conduct electricity. However, when the ionic compound is dissolved in water or melted, the ions become free to move. In this state, they can carry an electric charge, allowing the compound to conduct electricity. This is because the movement of ions constitutes an electric current.

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Answer from HIX Tutor

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

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