Do polyatomic ions with an odd number of electrons obey the octet rule?

Answer 1

Of course they cannot........

So I can give you a well-worn example.

#NO_2#, #"nitrogen(IV) dioxide"# clearly has an odd electron. Why clearly?
A reasonable Lewis structure would be #O=N^(+)-O^-#; there are 6 electrons around nitrogen and thus it bears a positive charge. Because there are only 6 valence electrons around nitrogen, this centre bears (i) a formal positive charge; and (ii) a single, nitrogen-centred electron.
The lone electron on nitrogen is conceived to couple with another #NO_2# centre to form the #O_2N-NO_2# dimer, where there is again formal charge separation. Can you represent this by means of Lewis structures?
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Answer 2

Because atoms typically gain, lose, or share electrons to reach a stable electron configuration with eight valence electrons, the octet rule does not apply to polyatomic ions with an odd number of electrons. Specifically, a polyatomic ion with an odd number of electrons cannot achieve a full octet for all of the atoms within the ion.

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Answer from HIX Tutor

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

When evaluating a one-sided limit, you need to be careful when a quantity is approaching zero since its sign is different depending on which way it is approaching zero from. Let us look at some examples.

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